Scallops with Carrot Spirals & Yellow Pepper Slivers

Skillet Scallops with veggie spirals

Skillet Scallops with veggie spirals

Here is recipe for a simple pan-fry preparation of scallops. This is a serving for ONE!

  • 5-8 scallops – fresh/defrosted on a bed of paper towel in the fridge overnight
  • 1 tsp of coconut oil
  • 1/2 carrot spiralled (I find you can do a whole carrot and when it is spiraled it is so easy to eat-up)
  • 1/4 yellow pepper (thinly sliced)
  • sprinkiing of pink himalayan sal
  • 2 Tsp thinly chopped green onions
  • Red onions for colour

Heat pan to medium low temperature. Add the coconut oil to the pan. Allow pan to heat up and place the scallops in the oil. Brown the scallops on each side for a few seconds.

Leave the scallops to cook for only a few minutes (the colour will change from translucent to white). While the scallops cook on one side of the pan; add the spiraled carrots (these need only a few minutes to soften. I like my peppers with some texture, so when the carrots are tender, take the peppers out of the pan as well. Place veggies on your plate & gently arrange the scallops on top. Sprinkle the onions on top for texture & colour.

Enjoy!

Lemon-Baked Salmon

Day 24 – Dinner

This is a family recipe taught to me over 20 years ago by my dear ole brother, Chef Christopher. We were barbecuing at our old Riverdale-home and this simple recipe resulted in a wondrously tasty, salmon fillet. (And no-mess afterwards!)

  • One salmon fillet (or whole salmon – should you be adventurous & near BC)
  • Lemon – wash & cut into 1 cm thick slices
  • one onion – peeled & cut into 1 cm rings
  • 1-2 Tbsp olive oil

Lay the salmon on top of a piece of foil large enough to wrap around the entire salmon. Slide the slices of lemon beneath the salmon fillet so the salmon is raised up from the foil. Pile the onion rings on the top surface of the salmon. Finally drizzle the olive oil over the entire fish. Seal up the foil leaving space for the fish to steam. Place on a baking tray or pan and bake @200F for 35 minutes.

Be careful when opening as it will be steamy! The onions are soft and carmelly; the lemon has infused into the salmon. It is lovely and light.

Spring Detox – in Five Steps

Spring is the in the air in Hong Kong and the Northern Hemisphere. The air is filled with promise and opportunity. We are still having breaks of cooler weather, allowing us to make certain our plans for the brightness and energy of summer sunshine and heat. However, as the sun moves higher in the sky we will need to prepare for the energizing rays that will jumpstart us into a season of speed & activity. So, let us take advantage of this pre-summer season as the perfect

DIET

The easy step is the cleanse the body. By changing our eating habits we can quickly change the way that we interact with the world: improving our energy, sleep and moods. The Whole30 diet outlines a healthy program to eliminate common allergens from the diet. The three main sensitivities include: wheat, dairy and soy. By eating a simple diet that is based on a large portion of vegetables and good sources of protein, you can start to cleanse the body.

SUPPLEMENTS & HERBS

There are some terrific supplements and herbs that can be used to support the organs of elimination during your cleanse. To assist the liver detoxification process try Gold D-Tox for terrific combination of herbs to support the cytochrome p450 process. A gentle, yet effective herb Dandelion acts on many levels: clearing the urinary tract; providing mineral support; and cleansing the liver – take a tsp/day in water each morning. To assist the bowel you can add in a non-offensive probiotic which assist the body with digestion, elimination and immune function as well. Embrace your coconut oil – great for eliminating microbes from the body; decreasing inflammation; improving memory; cleansing the bowel, nourishing the skin and making food taste great. Add a tablespoon or two for great source of fat.

EMOTION

Along with the typical cleanse of the organs it is important that we cleanse our minds as well. On a piece of paper, write a list of the the ideas that you are ready to let go of; take your written list in your hand and repeat:

I’m sorry; please forgive me; I love you

Now, take your list to your yoga class; a meditation class; or another place that is sacred to you. Let go of that list by burying it, ripping into pieces or burning it and leaving it behind.

HOUSE DETOX

Spring cleaning is a time for releasing the piles of unneeded items in your house. Pick one section of you home for a one or two hour session. During each session prepare three bags for your stuff; and ask yourself three simple questions: keep; toss; give-away? Things that you are keeping must fall into three categories: used in the last year; couldn’t live without; ready for use today. These categories will eliminate holding on to things that were once useful and useable. There is no space in our minds for new opportunities when we hold onto the past. There is no space for health when we hold onto illness. There is no place for happiness when we hold on to anger.

CELEBRATE

Finally, find a way to celebrate the changes you have made. Take a long walk in nature; go for a swim in the ocean; or jump on a bicycle. Celebrate yourself for making these changes and becoming a healthier, happier, friendlier person!

Food made with Love – Zen Organics Farm Visit

A trip to a farm is a great family day-trip. And imagine this, you can do a farm visit through HomeGrown Foods in Hong Kong! This past weekend my family took a trip out to Zen Organics with a group of people from Slow Food Hong Kong: we picked; ate and listened to the vegetables.

Joey, the farmer showed us around her farm and let the kids harvest vegetables from the farm. We had so much lettuce we gave extra produce to our neighbours. The badge Joey is wearing is from the youareloved.ca collection.

Hong Kong has a growing movement of people who are concerned about the quality and character of their food. There are several restaurants in Hong Kong that are focusing on the source and quality of food by supporting local agriculture.

Chef Todd, from Posto Republico says that the “quality” of the food is an integral part of creating a tasty dish. Finding the right quality of food is difficult in Hong Kong as so much of our food is imported from so far away. The closer to the food is to home the better the quality. As well, the more farmers/acre of farm results in better quality and higher nutritional value of food. Of course those farmers are adding the secret ingredient that grow the best vegetables: LOVE.

Recently when I was asked for my secret “discoveries” for health as a Naturopathic Doctor I reported, “The most important aspects of good nutrition is to eat food that is grown, harvested, cooked and eaten with LOVE.” I believe if we eat less food, with a higher nutritional value, and huge quantities of LOVE there will be food for all of us.

Organic vs. Local Milk in Hong Kong

Taking a break from the usual is also a good thing to do when it comes to food choices. Too often we can get into a rut of eating the same fruits, vegetables, proteins, etc. Even the products and brand names are repeated over and over again. One of the advantages of moving to a new country is that you are forced to re-evaluate all of the foods that you are eating. [There is only so much healthy shopping one can do at Gateway!] As well, because the familiar is completely absent, the need to make an educated selection becomes even more essential; and it becomes a good time to evaluate our choices, from an: environmental, nutrtional and “resilience” farming perspective.

Happy CowIn Hong Kong, the only Organic milk is imported from Australia or Canada. So, from an environmentally-sustainable perspective does it make sense for me to be drinking organic milk that is shipped in from so far away? Or should I be purchasing the milk produced right here in Hong Kong? I need to consider the greenhouse gases that are emitted during transportation. Yet, I have discovered that transportation is in fact responsible for only 1/10 of the greenhouse gas emitted during food production. 

Rather than considering the greenhouse gas load, I turn to a concern with the farming practices used on the farms in each country. Paul Roberts, author of The End of Food, writes of the “resilience” factor: how sustainable are the farming practices over the long-term? Roberts explains that the farming land mass required to produce organic food is much greater than other methods of farming. As well, often feed and fertilizer for organic farms needs to be shipped in from overseas, thus adding to the environmental and financial cost of producing organic food. On the other hand a study from the UK states http://www.i-sis.org.uk/OAMCC.php that organic food is much less energy dependent and CO2-contributing.

So then, is Organic food only for the elite few who can afford the price and can afford the land mass required? Roberts professes there is a middle of the road; where food is grown locally, in inner-city warehouses or “vertical farms” http://www.verticalfarm.com/ , using minimal pesticides (this would a system closed to unwanted pests) and using appropriate amounts of fertilizer.

My dream is for a happy food source, happy: farmers, produce, workers, transporters and happy cows who love the food they are producing. As in the book, Water for Chocolate, http://blog.freshlevant.com/2010/06/intentional-cooking-with-love.html the mood and intention of the chef (and farmer?) dictates the effect of the food on the consumers body. Back in the 90s I worked with Happy Planet Juice company (I supplied them with web hosting and email addresses) – that’s what I am talking about, happy food http://www.happyplanet.com/. So if anyone knows of some happy cows in the Hong Kong area, please, let me know. Cause happy cows make me happy and make more milk! http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/2009/01/29/2009-01-29_happy_cows_produce_more_milk_study_finds.html